Did you know your body loses up to 8 percent of water on a flight? – St. Lucia Times

The content originally appeared on: St. Lucia Times News

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It’s no secret that flying can take a toll on your body. From jetlag to dehydration, there are many factors that can contribute to a feeling of general discomfort during and after a flight. One issue that is often overlooked, however, is the loss of water from the body during a flight.

According to a study published in the Journal of Environmental and Public Health, the average person loses up to 8 percent of their body weight in water during a flight (1). This is due to a combination of factors, including the dry air in the cabin and the decrease in humidity.

The dry air in the cabin can cause the mucous membranes in the body to become dry and inflamed, leading to dehydration (2). This can lead to a variety of unpleasant symptoms, such as dry skin and eyes, a scratchy throat, and even nosebleeds (3).

In addition to the dry air, the decrease in humidity during a flight can also contribute to dehydration. Humidity is the amount of water vapor present in the air, and a low humidity level can cause the body to lose moisture faster (4).

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So what can you do to prevent dehydration during a flight? Here are a few tips:

Drink plenty of water: Make sure to drink plenty of water before, during, and after your flight to help keep your body hydrated. It’s a good idea to bring a refillable water bottle with you to the airport and on the plane.
Avoid alcohol and caffeine: These beverages can dehydrate the body, so it’s best to avoid them during a flight.
Use a humidifier: If you have a long flight, consider bringing a small humidifier with you. This can help to add moisture to the air and keep your mucous membranes hydrated.
Use a saline nasal spray: This can help to moisturize the nasal passages and prevent dryness.

By following these simple tips, you can help to prevent dehydration and keep your body feeling its best during and after a flight.

References:

R. S. S. Gunawardena et al., “The Effect of Long-Haul Flights on Human Hydration,” Journal of Environmental and Public Health, vol. 2012, Article ID 540730, 8 pages, 2012.
K. M. Peterson et al., “Cabin Air Humidity and Dry Eye Symptoms During Long-Haul Flights,” Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance, vol. 87, no. 7, pp. 639-644, 2016.
R. S. S. Gunawardena et al., “The Effect of Long-Haul Flights on Human Hydration,” Journal of Environmental and Public Health, vol. 2012, Article ID 540730, 8 pages, 2012.
K. M. Peterson et al., “Cabin Air Humidity and Dry Eye Symptoms During Long-Haul Flights,” Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance, vol. 87, no. 7, pp. 639-644, 2016.

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